Understand: the team maps out the problem to focus on, and unites under a shared brain; this phase involves lightning talks, which are 10- to 15-minute sessions given by knowledge experts, as well as the “How might we” note-taking method, and affinity mapping; the team puts himself in the shoes of the user with user journey mapping, user interviews, empathy building exercises, and success metrics;

On-boarding of users for testing: Design Sprint ends the 5th day with the validation of the prototype with the real user target: but will you always find the user target at your door in one day? Some prototypes need real on-boarding  endeavor that shall not be underestimated. What if the Google Design Sprinters target farmers from the Middle-Esat with their creative idea? Will they will find them in the Silicon Valley in the neighborhood of the Google Campus? Probably not.
While we assume you’re familiar with the original Design Sprint, here’s a quick recap: the Design Sprint is a five-day process to solve big problems and test ideas. A dedicated team discusses a challenge, designs potential solutions, and tests them with real users. You start with something vague, and finish with real feedback and something extremely tangible in just five days.
The “Design Sprint” is one of the fastest trending innovation and design thinking approaches I’ve seen in the past decade. It is now a part of our language to describe a specific kind of innovation session. This design sprint training article shares an overview of the process and resources you can use throughout. The design sprint concept has been made famous by Google Ventures in the book Sprint by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, and Braden Kowitz. It is a 5 day approach with specific activities each day of the week and each part of the day. I like it because it is something fun to learn and experience with a design sprint training workshop. The design sprint process seems like a combination of design thinking, lean startup, and agile for an approach to innovation that is rapid. You may have already heard about the Sprint book and the 5 day approach. BUT, did you know that there is also a 3 day design sprint kit from Google as well?
What I Find Noteworthy:  They have a certification program and a mentor program. If you pass their Sprint Master certification exam, you can serve as a mentor to other students in future classes, and join their online community of Sprint Masters. Students learn not one, but two different approaches to design sprints (Jake Knapp’s sprint model and Tenny Pinheiro’s MVS service start-up model).
Our Udacity course is a fantastic introduction to the Design Sprint. Our MasterClass has enough brand new in-depth exercises and exclusive resources that you can’t find anywhere else, to help take you to the next level. Because we know you’ll love our course, we’re happy to give all AJ&Smart Udacity students 299€ (the original price of the Udacity course) off their purchase of our Masterclass. Just email your receipt from the Udacity course to [email protected]!
The drawback of a design sprint is that it is a serious undertaking. Many organizations shy away from dedicating the energy of a team or even one individual for a full week straight. They tend to not take a focused approach and rather opt with weekly meetings, etc. A true design sprint will take a week! The good news is that you can involve another firm in helping you to run the sprint and many of these people will bring an outside perspective and experience with this sort of design thinking innovation approach.
Richard Thaler, the Nobel Prize winning economist, talks about a mythical species that is real only to an economist. The Homo Economicus — he calls them Econ for short. An Econ is an extremely rational being and believes in maximizing utility with every decision they make. This is what a prototypical Econ looks and behaves like: I believe when we… Read More →
It’s often difficult for us humans to challenge our assumptions and everyday knowledge, because we rely on building patterns of thinking in order to not have to learn everything from scratch every time. We rely on doing everyday processes more or less unconsciously — for example, when we get up in the morning, eat, walk, and read — but also when we assess challenges at work and in our private lives. In particular, experts and specialists rely on their solid thought patterns, and it can be very challenging and difficult for experts to start questioning their knowledge. https://www.tatvasoft.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/dynamic_systems_development_model_methodology.jpg
We wrap up Day 2 by setting the stage for what needs to happen after a design sprint. This is critical. One of the more popular misperceptions is that you’ll have your MVP at the conclusion of your design sprint — not true. You’ll have validation of a single, well-focused challenge within that solution, but there’s more that needs to happen to transition from design sprint to building those products & services.
Jake Knapp describes Design Sprints as a greatest hits of productivity, decision making, innovation, creativity, and design — and I think that’s true. But I recently took part in a sprint which modified this “greatest hits” formula heavily. My gut feeling was that these modifications were not beneficial, but since I was unfortunately not in a position to change the process, I chose to view it as an opportunity to gather data, and do a comparative analysis between this sprint, and the GV process outlined in the book — to learn, and to be more prepared for the next time around.
A complete Sprint process involves user testing in the last two days. Scheduling is hard and resources are limited. It’s very easy to just do half of a Sprint and fall in love with the ideas your team come up with. A successful Sprint always include research with end users or at least internal people who is not in the Sprint team to validate the ideas. I would even recommend lower the fidelity of your prototype to squeeze in time for research. Testing some sketches on paper is definitely better than having a polished interactive prototype that haven’t been validated by anyone. You always learn something from user research, so you should always, always include research in your Sprint process.
The Design Sprint has been developed and popularised by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky and Braden Kowitz, who together published the book ‘Sprint- How To Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days’ (2016). Designer Jake Knapp created the five-day process at Google. The methodology has been adopted by many Google Ventures and highly successful startups such as Uber, Blue Bottle Coffee, Slack, and Shopify.
Enterprises that have well-established processes may also look to a design sprint as a way to accelerate their product design and development so that they can work more like a fast-moving startup. The accelerated learning can give the enterprise an advantage and also reduce the amount of resource investments for exploration of product ideas and concepts. Spending three to five days on a project idea to see if it makes sense to move forward is better than working three to five months, only to discover it would have been better to not have proceeded at all.
For example, if your problem is “How to build a better newsletter for existing customers to increase brand loyalty”, you probably don’t need a Design Sprint since you already know the solution of better brand loyalty is a better newsletter. Just create a project and follow the normal product design process. You can still prototype and test with users, but it probably doesn’t require everyone to drop whatever they are working on for a week to figure out the design.
Why did we tell you this story? Telling stories can help us inspire opportunities, ideas and solutions. Stories are framed around real people and their lives. Stories are important because they are accounts of specific events, not general statements. They provide us with concrete details that help us imagine solutions to particular problems. While we’re at it, please watch this 1-minute video to help you get started understanding what Design Thinking is about.
Today, the best companies in the world are using the revolutionary design sprint process to create, prototype, test, and release new products, as well as develop new strategies, enter new markets, and more. In this program, you'll learn exactly how and why the design sprint process is so effective, and why it's become so integral to the success of so many leading companies. To ensure you're learning from the best, we've partnered with international design firm AJ&Smart, who have pioneered a Version 2.0 of this influential process to design products for Lufthansa, Zalando, Red Bull, and more.
Braden Kowitz added story-centered design, an unconventional approach that focuses on the customer journey instead of individual features or technologies. Michael Margolis took customer research—which can typically take weeks to plan and often delivers confusing results—and figured out a way to get crystal clear results in just one day. John Zeratsky helped us start at the end, and focus on measuring results with the key metrics from each business. And Daniel Burka brought firsthand expertise as an entrepreneur to ensure every step made sense in the real world.
There are many variants of the Design Thinking process in use today, and they have from three to seven phases, stages, or modes. However, all variants of Design Thinking are very similar. All variants of Design Thinking embody the same principles, which were first described by Nobel Prize laureate Herbert Simon in The Sciences of the Artificial in 1969. Here, we will focus on the five-phase model proposed by the Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford, which is also known as d.school. We’ve chosen d.school’s approach because they’re at the forefront of applying and teaching Design Thinking. The five phases of Design Thinking, according to d.school, are as follows:
In just one exciting and eye-opening day, Sprintmaster Stéphane Cruchon will take you and your team through this revolutionary way of working. You’ll come away from this specialized condensed training program confident in your ability to facilitate your own Sprints, recruit the ideal team, and have a clear vision about testing and prototyping tools.
You’re the product person in your organization. You may have no one reporting to you. You might have 50 people in your product group. You might be responsible for the entire product. Maybe the design team doesn’t report to you, nor do the developers or marketing and sales teams. Maybe you’re in a startup without all those defined roles, and you wear a lot of hats. Maybe you’re in a large enterprise organization that has each one defined to the nth degree. Maybe you are a product design freelancer. You might work in an agency as a consultant. You probably have read a blog post about this process. Maybe you even tried one yourself. You’re very likely wondering how your unique needs will work with design sprints and are seeking more information than you can find in a few blog posts.
What I Find Noteworthy:  This appears to be AJ&Smart’s live in-person training ($3,500+) with all the tools, templates, and slides, but at half the price. The class teaches the latest 2018 version of the design sprint — the 4 day Design Sprint 2.0 created by AJ&Smart in partnership with Jake Knapp. This class just launched in May 2018 and seems perfect for anyone looking to get the full design sprint training experience from a top-tier design sprint firm, without having to travel or take time away from work. The training is very comprehensive, covering not only fundamentals of the design sprint, but also best practices/tools for selling-in sprints, advanced facilitation, and delivery of sprint results to leadership/clients. VERY compelling offering.
Page 203 - ... unjustified and erroneous, so that they inevitably distort the truth. In fact, the historicity of our existence entails that prejudices, in the literal sense of the word, constitute the initial directedness of our whole ability to experience. Prejudices are biases of our openness to the world. They are simply conditions whereby we experience something — whereby what we encounter says something to us.‎
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